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Zimbabwe Sex Workers use Bread Packaging as a Sub for Condoms

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Zimbabwe is back at it! Sex workers use Bread Packaging as a sub for Condoms 

Zimbabwe Sex workers, in the diamond-rich Chiadzwa Mining Area, use Bread Packaging as a substitute for Condoms. When in short supply, it came to light during a media tour organized by the National Aids Council, that the bread packaging is worn by the male clients. 

The area, which is famous for alluvial diamond mining, has attracted hundreds of artisanal miners, popularly referred to as “magweja”, which in turn has drawn prostitutes in Chiadzwa.

According to The Manica Post senior reporter, Ray Bande, in Chiadzwa, a condom is sold for between US$1 and US$2, depending on the scarcity of the product at that particular time.

How much do condoms cost in your country? In Zimbabwe, they cost more than their clip-toe currency, if you know what I mean. 

Also Read: Sex in Zimbabwe: How a private doctor penetrated poor woman as she laid in hospital bed

“This is normal in Chiadzwa and clients find nothing unusual about it. We normally do it because we do not want to lose a client, especially those who insist on the use of condoms.”- said a 21-year-old Mutare sex worker. She was addressing Journalists at the NAC event, aimed at having an appreciation of some of the programs being implemented in the fight against HIV and AIDS. 

“However, on some occasions, we get nasty clients who refuse to use the bread packaging and opt for unprotected sex.” 

The 21-year-old narrated her experience in the world’s oldest profession. “We normally sell condoms among ourselves, so if one is desperate to be intimate with a big-spending client, they will buy that condom for as high as US$2.” She adds, “They willingly buy it because they will recover their money from the client’s payment.”

What do the experts say about Condoms?

Meanwhile, Mutare medical practitioner, Dr. Tendai Zuze said using bread packaging is risky as it might not be strong enough to sustain the pressure of friction during intercourse. “It can easily break and put the people involved at risk of transmission of sexually transmitted disease,” said Zuze.

Population Health Solutions (PSH) Clinical Services coordinator, Maxwell Madyauta, said various interventions are being deployed to combat an increase in STI cases in Chiadzwa.

More: The Manica Post

 

Also Read: Making sense of prostitution, human trafficking and sex work and what’s the way forward

 

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